What tech companies are doing to control the spread of fake news

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how to spot fake news | iTMunch

The term “fake news” first gained popularity around the 2016 presidential elections, and since then politicians have not stopped talking about it. However, misinformation isn’t just a political issue. False news is also highly financially motivated. Spammers usually communicate using names of established brands to lure users to visit their websites. More often than not, these websites are ads that allow spammers to make money. According to a September 2019 report by the Global Disinformation Index (GDI), close to $235 million worth of online ads ended up on websites that have been marked for disinformation by multiple disinformation-focused organizations. What’s shocking is that the sample tested by the GDI showed that Google sends adverts to 70% of the websites that were flagged for misinformation [1].

Major tech companies also saw the rise of fake news as the pandemic spread across the world. Another new research by the GDI shows that tech players like Google and Amazon are providing revenue streams to known disinformation sites spreading coronavirus misinformation and conspiracies. In a sample survey of about 50 coronavirus conspiracy sites, the GDI found Google provided ad services to 86% of these websites [2]. 

Combating fake news is an important goal of major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google.

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Steps taken by tech companies to combat fake news:

1. Google

To prevent the spread of fake news, Google’s first attempt was the Google News Initiative. The initiative had three goals – to highlight legitimate journalism while fighting false news. To help credible news sites to grow and to give journalists reliable tools to do their jobs.

Google has also worked with organizations such as ‘First Draft’ to create “Disinfo Lab” that is focused on combating misleading news during elections.

Google also announced that there will be a round-the-clock response team that will be dedicated to coronavirus and will scrape out misinformation from Search and Youtube. 

2. YouTube

YouTube has improved its ranking system to decrease the visibility of trash comments. It also launched Top News shelf in search results and Breaking News shelf on the user’s homepage. It also surfaces authoritative content first in the search results. It also invested in trusted journalist organizations to improve news quality.

YouTube has also been launching information panels in the U.S., European countries and India that conduct fact-checking. It also increased authoritative content in the Watch Next section along with improving their machine learning to classify content as harmful, risky and fake.

Google-owned YouTube also added the World Health Organization page on the virus outbreak. The link also showed up below videos.

3. Facebook

When it comes to curbing fake news on social media, Facebook is trying to get better at identifying misleading information with the help of third-party fact-checking organizations. Facebook is also applying machine learning to assist its response team in detecting malicious activities and fraud.  

They have also launched a Facebook Journalism Project. Through this project, Facebook collaborates with news companies to develop tools, products and services for journalists that will ultimately help people make informed decisions.

Facebook is also a founder and a funder of the News Integrity Initiative. This is administered by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. The initiative’s goal is to increase news literacy to grow trust in journalism around the world.

As for containing the spread of coronavirus, Facebook is inserting a box in the user’s news feed which is directing them to the Centers for Disease Control’s page about coronavirus. CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company would grant unlimited free ad credits to the World Health Organization to promote accurate information about the crisis.

SEE ALSO: Here’s how a Facebook Flaw gets users Fake Likes

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SEE ALSO: Are ‘Deepfake’ Videos Becoming a Cause for Deep Concern?

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Sources

[1] Global Disinformation Index Staff (2019) “The Quarter Billion Dollar Question: How is Disinformation Gaming Ad Tech” [Online] Available from: https://disinformationindex.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/GDI_Ad-tech_Report_Screen_AW16.pdf [accessed Sept 2019]

[2] Global Disinformation Index (2020) “Why is Ad Tech Funding These Ads on Coronavirus Conspiracy Sites?” [Online] available from: https://disinformationindex.org/2020/03/why-is-ad-tech-funding-these-ads-on-coronavirus-conspiracy-sites/ [acessed March 2020]

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Riddhi Jain is a technology content writer. She is based in India and has been working as a content writer since 2018. Riddhi has been writing content in the tech domain since May 2020 and can’t get enough of it. Riddhi has pursued most of her education from her hometown, Indore. She has graduated as a Bachelor of Business Administration and discovered her love for writing blogs while pursuing an internship during college. Once she discovered her love for writing, she went on to improve this skill set (and hasn’t stopped since). Riddhi’s writing relationship with iTMunch began in May 2020. This is where she developed a knack for writing content for the technology domain. She's an expert in tech content writing who has written over 700 blogs for iTMunch in just a year. Riddhi loves diving deep into tech sub-domains like financial technology, marketing technology, HR technology, Artificial Intelligence and gaming technology. She loves staying updated with the latest and upcoming trends in digital marketing, digital payments, fintech, gaming, web design and app development. She cherishes writing about futuristic technologies like blockchain and cryptocurrency, NFTs, Internet of Things, Facial Recognition, Machine Learning, Edge Computing, etc. Riddhi also likes to keep an eye on what’s going on with the tech titans like Google, Facebook and Apple. One of her major interests is in staying updated with the latest IT startups and the groundbreaking technologies they’re coming up with. When Riddhi is not writing content, she is binging on documentaries on Netflix (check out ‘The Great Hack’, ‘Seaspiracy’, and ‘What the Health’). She also likes reading books once in a while (Yuval Noah Harari and Michelle Magorian are some of her favorite authors). Riddhi also likes listening to podcasts like The Tim Ferriss Show (do listen to the ones with guest Naval Ravikant) and The Joe Rogan Experience.